Saturday, 25 October 2014

SOUTHBANK REFLECTIONS

Reflections on the Crown façade along Southbank. There is always something happening there, much reflected and much to reflect on...

This post is part of the Weekend Reflections meme.



Friday, 24 October 2014

DAWN ON THE YARRA

"Awake! for Morning in the Bowl of Night
Has flung the Stone that puts the Stars to Flight:
And Lo! the Hunter of the East has caught
The Sultan's Turret in a Noose of Light."

This post is part of the Skywatch Friday meme,
and also part of the Weekly TopShot meme,
and also part of the Photo of the Week meme.

Thursday, 23 October 2014

MELBOURNE STREET TREES 92 - ROBINIA

Robinia pseudoacacia, commonly known as the black locust, is a tree of the genus Robinia in the subfamily Faboideae of the pea family Fabaceae. It is native to the southeastern United States, but has been widely planted and naturalised elsewhere in temperate North America, Europe, Southern Africa, Australia and Asia and is considered an invasive species in some areas. A less frequently used common name is false Acacia, which is a literal translation of the specific epithet. It was introduced into Britain in 1636.

With a trunk up to 0.8 m diameter (exceptionally up to 52 m tall and 1.6 m diameter in very old trees), with thick, deeply furrowed blackish bark. The leaves are 10–25 cm long, pinnate with 9–19 oval leaflets, 2–5 cm long and 1.5–3 cm broad. Each leaf usually has a pair of short spines at the base, 1–2 mm long or absent on adult crown shoots, up to 2 cm long on vigorous young plants. The intensely fragrant (reminiscent of orange blossoms) flowers are white to lavender or purple, borne in pendulous racemes 8–20 cm long, and are edible. In France and in Italy Robinia pseudoacacia flowers are eaten as beignets after being coated in batter and fried in oil.

The fruit is a legume 5–10 cm long, containing 4–10 seeds. Although the bark and leaves are toxic, various reports suggest that the seeds and the young pods of the black locust are edible. Shelled seeds are safe to harvest from summer through fall, and are edible both raw and/or boiled. Due to the small nature of Black Locust seeds, shelling them efficiently can prove tedious and difficult.

The name locust is said to have been given to Robinia by Jesuit missionaries, who fancied that this was the tree that supported St. John in the wilderness, but it is native only to North America. The locust tree of Spain (Ceratonia siliqua or Carob Tree), which is also native to Syria and the entire Mediterranean basin, is supposed to be the true locust of the New Testament.

This post is part of the Floral Friday Fotos meme.








Wednesday, 22 October 2014

DAREBIN CREEK AT FAIRFIELD

Darebin Creek is a creek that runs through the northern suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It is the main watercourse of the Darebin Valley and a major tributary of the Yarra River. For tens of thousands of years it was used as a food and tool source sustainably by the Wurundjeri people, Indigenous Australians of the Kulin nation alliance, who spoke variations of the Woiwurrung language group.

The creek rises on the northern urban fringe of Melbourne north of the suburb of Epping, following a general southerly route and meeting the Yarra at Alphington. The creek forms much of the municipal boundary between the City of Darebin and City of Banyule. Formerly an intermittent stream, increased stormwater runoff with urbanisation of the Darebin Creek catchment has resulted in permanent water flow.

The creek runs through Darebin Parklands, a large nature reserve one or two kilometres northwest of the junction at which the creek meets the Yarra. The Darebin Creek Trail runs along the banks in the lower reaches of the creek. This is the creek at the Darebin Parklands in Alphington.

This post is part of the Waterworld Wednesday meme,
and also part of the Outdoor Wednesday meme,
and also part of the Wordless Wednesday meme.




Tuesday, 21 October 2014

SPRING SUNSHINE

We are beginning to experience the first few hot days in Melbourne, as Spring progresses into Summer. Tomorrow, we have a maximum of 31˚C forecast.

This post is part of the Our World Tuesday meme.

Monday, 20 October 2014

EUREKA TOWER

Melbourne's tallest skyscraper, the Eureka Tower, is a 297.3-metre skyscraper located in the Southbank precinct of Melbourne, Australia. Construction began in August 2002 and the exterior completed on 1 June 2006. The plaza was finished in June 2006 and the building was officially opened on 11 October 2006.

The project was designed by Melbourne architectural firm Fender Katsalidis Architects and was built by Grocon (Grollo Australia). The developer of the tower was Eureka Tower Pty Ltd, a joint venture consisting of Daniel Grollo (Grocon), investor Tab Fried and one of the Tower's architects Nonda Katsalidis. It was the world's tallest residential tower when measured to its highest floor, until surpassed by Ocean Heights and the HHHR Tower in Dubai.

This post is part of the Monday Mellow Yellows meme,
and also part of the Blue Monday meme.

Sunday, 19 October 2014

Saturday, 18 October 2014

POLLY AT SOUTH WHARF

Polly Woodside is a Belfast-built, three-masted, iron-hulled barque, preserved in Melbourne, Australia, and forming the central feature of the South Wharf precinct. The ship was originally built in Belfast by William J. Woodside and was launched in 1885. Polly Woodside is typical of thousands of smaller iron barques built in the last days of sail, intended for deep water trade around the world and designed to be operated as economically as possible.

Polly Woodside was closed to the public on 30 April 2006 to allow for the major redevelopment of the lower Yarra River's southern bank. The $1.4 billion redevelopment, announced by the Victorian Government in February 2006, included construction works for the new Melbourne Convention Centre immediately next to the Polly Woodside. The ship was temporarily relocated approximately 50 metres away to a mooring on the adjacent Yarra River on 26 August 2008 – its first move in 33 years – for a $13 million operational refurbishment and restoration of its dry dock home, board walk, and adjacent former wharf sheds.

Between this time and May 2009 the water within the Duke and Orr's Dry Dock was pumped out and a gated dam wall built at the entrance. The bottom of the dry dock was excavated and permanent keel supports built into the concrete base for Polly Woodside to sit upon, allowing the ship to be periodically dry docked for repairs. On 19 May 2009 the dam wall gates were opened allowing water to flow into the dry dock and Polly Woodside was returned to the Duke and Orr's Dry Dock. Polly Woodside was reopened to the public on 23 December 2010.

This post is part of the Weekend Reflections meme,
and also part of the Photo of the Week meme,
and also part of the Scenic Weekends meme.



Friday, 17 October 2014

SPRING SKY

View towards the West from Southbank. The blue waters of Port Phillip Bay can be seen in the distance and the banks of clouds promise some Spring showers. The first image is a HDR, while the second one is the same as the first, but it has been post-processed with Photoshop.

This post is part of the Skywatch Friday meme,
and also part of the Geometric Friday meme.


Thursday, 16 October 2014

MELBOURNE STREET TREES 91 - WILLOW BOTTLEBRUSH

Callistemon salignus, commonly known as Willow Bottlebrush or the White Bottlebrush, is an endemic Australian shrub or tree in the family Myrtaceae. The species occurs in New South Wales and Queensland. The species usually grows to between 4 and 10 metres in height and has narrow foliage, white papery bark, and new growth which is purplish-pink. The bottlebrush flower-spikes appear during spring. They are generally creamy white to yellow, though pink and red forms are also seen in cultivation.

The species was first formally described by botanist James Edward Smith in 1797 in Transactions of the Linnean Society of London, and named Metrosideros saligna. In 1826, botanist Robert Sweet indicated that the species should be transferred to the genus Callistemon in Sweet's Hortus Britannicus. In his 2006 paper "New Combinations in Melaleuca for Australian Species of Callistemon (Myrtaceae)", Lyndley Craven, a research botanist from the Australian National Herbarium, proposed that this species should be renamed as Melaleuca salicina.

Callistemon salignus can be used for providing shelter and screening and is well-suited as a street tree, or for planting in parks and gardens. Additionally, flowers will attract birds to a garden. The species is suited to a wide range of soil types, and can tolerate both wet and dry conditions, and near-coastal exposure.

This post is part of the Floral Friday Fotos meme.